In the Guest House: Kale Slaw

Quick note from Lex: Took a little cajoling but I finally convinced Mr Dickson to write this down. It does tickle him that so many people are growing kale but when questioned about what they’re doing with it, they’re either very coy or the answers don’t seem all that…delicious. Anyway, here he is.

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“Bacon!”

This recipe does not have bacon in it. It’s just that when I hear people espousing the virtues of: Kale! I want to ask them if they have heard of: Bacon! Bacon tastes good, kale does not.

Kale has this peppery (maybe) over the top green flavour that I can sometimes tolerate and other times makes me gag a little.  Apparently it is a super food and therefore really good for you.

I hear about kale’s health giving properties but I don’t really take in the science, I just hear that this leafy green vegetable may possibly undo some of the damage I may or may not have done to myself so far.  I know that this is not really the promise offered, but I’ve entered an age where my sense of mortality is compelling me to investigate the healthier alternatives in the hope of minimizing the effects of prior negligence.

Bacon tastes good. Kale does not.
Bacon tastes good. Kale does not.

That and it grows like crazy in the garden and you have to find something to do with it before it goes to seed and or the aphids get at it.

So I give you: Kale Slaw.

Ingredients:

10 Large kale leaves finely sliced – I use around a 2:1 ratio of kale to carrot but I often add more carrot if I don’t think it looks right.

1 Medium carrot grated

1/2 An apple grated

1 Spring onion finely sliced

2 – 4 tablespoons of THOMY mayonnaise, let your conscience guide you. I like the THOMY brand the best and I won’t guarantee success without it.

A pinch of salt and pepper

Some garlic chives.

Maybe a squirt or two of lemon or lime juice.

Combine all ingredients, bar mayonnaise, in a bowl. Mix well, then mix in mayo to taste at the end.

It’s basically your coleslaw recipe with kale in it instead of cabbage. Surprise!

I especially enjoy ‘filleting’ the kale. I like to imagine that I am on Master Chef and that this is a technique that only I employ – basically you drag the knife up either side of the stem from the bottom – the stem is discarded. I like to use the heavier leaves from the bottom of the plant for a texture more akin to cabbage so it is important to slice the kale finely so you don’t have to chew through these leathery straps of kale.

"Filleting" the kale
“Filleting” the kale

Enjoy. And if you don’t like it maybe you could sprinkle a little something on top. Maybe some “Bacon!”.

Kale Slaw - with fishcakes and roasted kipflers.
Kale Slaw – with fishcakes and roasted kipflers.

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How to: Make succulent canvas pot covers

We’re hosting a little luncheon this weekend to welcome Baby Boo to the family.  I’m including some potted succulents as part of the decor and making these canvas pot-covers to tart up the plain terracotta pots.

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Canvas pot holder

What you’ll need:

  • Primed artist canvas
  • Acrylic paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Paint pallette
  • Scissors
  • Pinking shears
  • Dressmakers pins
  • Pencil
  • Sewing machine
  • Matching thread
  • Tape measure
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Tools of the trade

First measure your pot. Wrap a tape measure around the widest part of your pot and check the measurement you’re taking will mean the pot will slip in and out easily.

Using your scissors cut out the length of canvas to suit your pots with an extra 6cm on the sides for overhang and 6cm to the overall height.

Paint your design onto the primed surface and leave to dry. I chose to paint gold patterns to fit in with the luncheon’s colour scheme.

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Paint your canvas and let it dry

Fold the canvas over in half so the fold is up along one side and pin in place. Mark the canvas where the angles need to go with a light pencil before stitching along the bottom and sides as shown with the dashed line below. Carefully trim the top and stitched side with the pinking shears.

w_canvas folded
Sew along the dashed lines

Turn the canvas inside out and fold over the top edge. Pop in your pot plant and adjust the turned over edge to suit the pot height. Arrange the canvas to suit and you have new sculpture like pots.

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Pop your plants in and voila!

Want to see more Projects?

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